Sunday, April 14

Wrestling Stables Better Than The Four Horsemen

Stables in pro wrestling are nothing new. Stables or alliances can be traced back to the early 1900s when the sport was still in its infancy. While stables and factions have been around for a long time, most wrestling fans will agree that the late 70s and 80s is when factions started becoming more of a regularity.



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5 Wrestling Stables That Had A Breakout Superstar (& 5 Who Failed To Do So)

Wrestling stables are meant to get one star or more over with fans. Some factions did that to great success, while others failed spectacularly.

One of the best-regarded stables of all time was the legendary Four Horsemen. While the group had many incarnations, its status never wavered much. Despite being so beloved though, there is an argument that can be made for a handful of other wrestling stables being better than The Horsemen.


The Undisputed Era Were The Heart & Soul Of NXT

Shocking The System And Collecting All The NXT Gold

Year Formed

2017

Year Disbanded

2021

Best Version

Adam Cole, Kyle O’Reilly, Bobby Fish, Roderick Strong


The Undisputed Era making it onto a list like this speaks volumes about how much pro wrestling has evolved over the years. During The Horsemen’s peak, there were only two major platforms for pro wrestlers to perform on. Today, there are several alternatives to mainstream WWE, including NXT.

From 2017 to 2021, The Undisputed Era carried the black and gold brand at just about every level. Adam Cole, Kyle O’Reilly, Bobby Fish, and Roderick Strong hogged all the NXT gold during their time in WWE. The only thing that would’ve been more impressive would’ve been doing it on the main roster.

The Dangerous Alliance Had A Brief But Impactful Run Together

A Stable Full Of Paul Heyman Guys

Year Formed

1991

Year Disbanded

1991

Best Version

Paul E. Dangerously, Rick Rude, Madusa, Steve Austin, Larry Zbysko, Arn Anderson, Bobby Eaton


Sometimes, in pro wrestling, quality goes a lot further than quantity. This was true for The Dangerous Alliance. The group was led by a young Paul Heyman and anchored by “Ravishing” Rick Rude as the group’s main star. It also featured incredible performers like Larry Zbyszko, Arn Anderson, Bobby Eaton, Madusa, and an up-and-coming Steve Austin.

Unfortunately, the group would only last a year together. Had it been given a longer shelf life, there’s no telling what this collection of Hall Of Fame talent could’ve achieved. They might’ve been able to rival The Four Horsemen’s achievements with a longer run together.

The Nation Of Domination Shows The Importance Of Representation

The First Impactful Minority Stable In WWE


Year Formed

1996

Year Disbanded

1998

Best Version

The Rock, Farooq, D-Lo Brown, Mark Henry, Kama Mustafa

When WWE experienced a massive boom in popularity during the 80s, the promotion didn’t feature an abundance of minority performers atop the card. Even popular minorities like The Junkyard Dog and Tito Santana were never presented as real threats to any main event-level stars.

In the mid-90s, The Nation Of Domination helped change that. The group would feature a former World Champion in Farooq and two future World Champions, including Mark Henry. It also spawned perhaps the biggest box office star ever in The Rock. Hard to top that, even for The Horsemen.


The Hart Foundation Had Two Versions That Made A Huge Impact

Family And National Pride Over Everything

Year Formed

1985

Year Disbanded

1997

Best Version

Bret Hart, Owen Hart, The British Bulldog, Jim Neidhart, Brian Pillman

The original Hart Foundation was formed in the mid-80s, consisting of Jimmy Hart, Bret Hart, and Jim “The Anvil” Neidhart. The group would go its separate ways during the early 90s but once again come together in 1997. While Jimmy Hart was no longer there, Hart and Neidhart were joined by Owen Hart, The British Bulldog, and eventually, Brian Pillman.

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Every Version Of The Hart Foundation, Ranked From Worst To Best

The Hart Foundation went through several iterations over the years, with each of these versions ranked from worst to best.

The revamped Hart Foundation would prove to be even better than the original. The faction held every major championship in WWE during 1997 and were the top antagonists in the company. Sadly, everything would fall apart in late 1997 after Brian Pillman’s untimely death and the events of Survivor Series 1997.


The Shield Went From Vigilantes To Workhorses

Three Future Main Eventers & World Champions In One Stable

Year Formed

2012

Year Disbanded

2019

Best Version

Roman Reigns, Dean Ambrose, Seth Rollins

The Four Horsemen get a lot of love for featuring so many top stars in one faction. However, The Horsemen couldn’t hold a candle to The Shield in terms of success in the wrestling business or wrestling accolades in general. The Four Horsemen technically featured six future World Champions throughout several incarnations.


The Shield, however, consisted of Roman Reigns, Seth Rollins, and Dean Ambrose. Coincidently, all three Shield members would not only go on to be future World Champions but Grandslam Champions in WWE. That fact alone might make The Shield the best wrestling stable ever when it’s all said and done.

The Bullet Club Takes Over Japan

A Global Phenomenon That Would Eventually Invade The United States

Year Formed

2013

Year Disbanded

Still Active

Best Version

Kenny Omega, The Young Bucks, Cody Rhodes, Hangman Page, Bad Luck Fale, Tama Tonga

While there’s no denying the impact of The Four Horsemen on American pro wrestling, they were far from a global phenomenon. The Bullet Club, on the other hand, had a global impact on pro wrestling the likes of which have never been seen before. The group’s popularity transcended New Japan Pro Wrestling and spilled over in the U.S.


Bullet Club even spawned a more popular subfaction, The Elite, which was the catalyst behind the creation of AEW. With all due respect to The Horsemen, they couldn’t even keep Jim Crockett Promotions in business, let alone help launch a new promotion.

The Bloodline Has Sat Atop WWE’s Food Chain For Years

Roman Reigns & His Cousins Rewrite The History Books

Year Formed

2021

Year Disbanded

Still Active

Best Version

Roman Reigns, The Usos, Solo Sikoa, Paul Heyman, Sami Zayn

Longevity is the hardest thing to attain in pro wrestling. This is especially true for modern-day pro wrestling. The truth is, today’s wrestling audience has a short attention span and is constantly on the lookout for the new hot trend. This is what has made The Bloodline stand out so much in recent years.


We’re currently in our fourth year of the Bloodline storyline and there are no signs of it getting old or stale. Roman Reigns and his cousins have dominated WWE in a way that The Horsemen could never even imagine. They are the modern-day standard for longevity.

D-Generation X Helps Usher In A New Era In WWE

The Group Was Attitude Personified

Year Formed

1997

Year Disbanded

2010

Best Version

Triple H, Chyna, X-Pac, New Age Outlaws

In 1996, WWE lost the stranglehold it had on the professional wrestling business for over a decade. At the time, WCW had evolved with the times while WWE was stuck in the late 80s and early 90s from a storyline and creative standpoint. D-Generation-X helped change that in a significant way.


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5 Best and 5 Worst Moments Of D-Generation X

D-Generation X was a game changer for the WWE, but it wasn’t without flaw. These are the 5 best and 5 worst moments of the squad.

The original group of Shawn Michaels, Triple H, and Chyna would be groundbreaking. After Michaels retired from wrestling in 1998, Triple H would add X-Pac and The New Age Outlaws to the group and keep on rolling. In 2006, HBK and Triple H would reunite and once again don the DX colors. Overall, the group was a pivotal part of WWE for over a decade.

Evolution Creates A Stable Full Of World Champions

Past, Present, & Future Legends All In One Group

Year Formed

2003

Year Disbanded

2005

Best Version

Triple H, Ric Flair, Randy Orton, Batista


Nostalgia can play a big role in pro wrestling. That was one of the factors that made Evolution so successful. Not only did the group have a touch of nostalgia by featuring Ric Flair, but it also featured a perennial World Champion in Tripe H and two future World Champions in Batista and Randy Orton.

The group gave many fans old-school Four Horsemen vibes and matched The Horsemen’s success early on with every member of the group simultaneously holding championship gold. As time has gone on, Evolution’s impact has proven to be greater than its spiritual predecessors.

The nWo Changed The Landscape Of Pro Wrestling

The Beginning Of More Realistic Storylines In Wrestling

Year Formed

1996

Year Disbanded

2002

Best Version

Hollywood Hogan, Scott Hall, Kevin Nash


As much as The Four Horsemen accomplished in pro wrestling, they were never able to come close to having the impact that The nWo had. Not only did the group change WCW’s fortunes, it helped reshape pro wrestling going forward. The group helped infuse more realism in what was previously an outlandish and at times whacky product.

The nWo’s success forced Vince McMahon and WWE to go back to the drawing board. The result was the rise of The Attitude Era. While The Four Horsemen were great, they never had that type of impact on the wrestling business overall. It’s hard to find a more important stable in wrestling than The nWo.

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